Ten Things Non-Profits Should Know When Choosing Office Space

  By Cheri Hennessy Durst

Photos courtesy CollaborationCore
(Photos courtesy CollaborationCore)

Is your organization growing out of a home office or considering moving your established set-up to a new facility? Before getting into the details of searching, your board should discuss the big picture issues such as:

  • Will a new location help our mission and the community we serve?
  • Should we rent, or is it time to own?
  • Should we do the searching or hire a realtor specializing in office rentals?

Build with a Purpose, a New Jersey-based non-profit, can help you start the conversation with their Helpful Guides to Facility Development.

Even though change can be exciting, for some moving your office from one location to another can be a daunting task. Many of the things you, your staff and volunteers are accustomed to may now turn into expenses for your organization. To make the process a bit easier, below are ten key questions to ask when searching for your new location.

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Chronic Under-Funding of Non-Profits: An Unacceptable Risk

By Linda M. Czipo

New Jesey Non-Profits 2016: Trends and Outlook - Cover The Center for Non-Profits has just released its New Jersey Non-Profits 2016: Trends and Outlook report, highlighting the findings from our 2016 annual non-profit survey.

The full report lays out in detail the ups and downs experienced by non-profits during the previous year, and their outlook for 2016. Here are the major highlights, based on the 311 New Jersey non-profit respondents from late January/early February 2016:

  • Nearly three-quarters of responding organizations reported that demand for services had increased during the past year.
  • Nearly four-fifths expected demand to continue rising in 2016.
  • Only two-fifths reported receiving more total funding in 2015 than in 2014, but nearly two-thirds reported that their expenses had increased during the same period.
  • Over one-third (35%) reported that expenses exceeded support and revenue during their most recently completed fiscal year; the proportion was even higher (44%) among larger organizations, those with annual budgets of $1.5 million or more.
  • Seventy percent expected their total expenses to increase in 2016, but fewer than half (47%) expected total 2016 funding to increase.

If you’ve seen our previous surveys or if you work regularly with non-profits, these findings may sound like variations of a familiar theme. You may even think that they’re better than during the worst of the recession – and that’s true. But if you care about the well-being of the non-profit community and non-profits’ ability to provide vital programs and services, these numbers should generate deep concern.

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Can You Double Online Giving in Six Months?

Darian Rodriguez Heymanby Darian Rodriguez Heyman

More and more nonprofit donations take place in today’s digital landscape, but how can causes of all sizes ensure their online storefront is not only open for business, but optimized?

As I explored this critical issue in my new book, Nonprofit Fundraising 101, I interviewed Roderick Campbell, the CEO of nonprofit fundraising platform CommitChange. He shared a few takeaways from their efforts to maximize digital donations for Mercy House, a $3.8M nonprofit that has provided housing and support to California’s homeless since 1989. We also talked about a range of resources to help smaller, grassroots organizations in the early stages of embracing online fundraising, including Network for Good, NTEN, and Beth Kanter’s blog.

This simple formula helped Mercy House double online giving in just six months, and I believe it can do the same for your nonprofit, too.

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Cybersecurity is NOT just an IT problem

By June NotoNJAMHAA IT Project

The recent announcement by a Hollywood, California, hospital that it paid $17,000 to computer hackers for the return of its computer data is yet another reminder that cybersecurity is everyone’s problem.

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Funding from the Grantor’s Perspective

by Susan Merrill O’Connor

Funder Panel: Lenora Green, Marion O'Neill, Jeffrey Vega, Kelly Ingram
(l-r) Lenora Green, Marion O’Neill, Jeffrey Vega, Kelly Ingram

What do you get when you put four savvy grantmakers in front of a room of willing and passionate non-profits? No, not something resembling ABC’s reality TV show Shark Tank, but a friendly and supportive exchange of useful and honest insight.

Last month, staff and volunteers from New Jersey non-profits attended Grant Giving from the Grantor’s Perspective, a breakout session at the Princeton Community Works conference. The impressive panel was a balance of corporate and community foundation funders:

The session was moderated by Linda Czipo, Executive Director of the Center for Non-Profits.

Here are just a few highlights from this engaging conversation:

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Branding Your Non-Profit: The Value of Your Mission

by Sally Glick

Sally_Glick_Final_744-resizedThere is a good deal of discussion in both the for-profit and non-profit communities about the importance of an organization’s brand. When you have a well-established name you are able to effectively and efficiently differentiate your group and build a loyal following. Think about some well-known brands, like Ben & Jerry’s (community commitment); Disney (extraordinary family fun); Peace Corps (global support for the world’s vulnerable); or America Reads (volunteers for literacy). In each instance, the organization has promoted a brand that resonates with its audience and generates an immediate emotional reaction.

You can do that!

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Top 5 Takeaways from the 2015 Annual Conference

OConnor_Susan_175x175By Susan Merrill O’Connor

  • Nametags recycled – check.
  • Evaluations tallied – check.
  • Bill received from venue – check.
  • Wedding dress sent to cleaners – oops, wrong post-event checklist … although the Center staff still has a warm glow after the love we non-profits all shared less than a month ago at our annual conference, Power, Purpose, Performance: Non-Profits Growing a Thriving Garden State, on December 2, 2015.

2015 NJ Non-profit Conference LogoDid we see you there along with over 400 of your closest non-profit friends and family? If so, we hope we got a chance to tell you how much we appreciate all you do for New Jersey. But, often like being in the wedding party, we only had fragmented conversations, waves from afar and quick handshakes or hugs.

The conference, as we all know, isn’t a party (though there was plenty of good food and enjoyment to be had). It’s a chance to connect with allies old and new, foster a collective spirit, and gain valuable insight and tools for the good work you do every day.

The 2015 conference was also the start of some wonderful relationships and important dialogues — including these Top 5 Takeaways many of you shared with us:

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Tips for Making Informed Giving Decisions

by Linda M. Czipo

Every day, our lives are touched in some way by the work of charitable organizations. Charities play an essential social and economic role in making our communities attractive places to live, work and grow.

While a slow economic recovery and rising demand for charitable services mean that charities need donor support more than ever, donors may become overwhelmed by the various requests for contributions. For donors trying to sort through these appeals, wise giving choices have never been more crucial.

You don’t need to have an elaborate plan to “do good,” but you can take steps that will help you to be confident in the decisions you make.

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Why Equality is actively harmful to Equity

by Vu Le

Vu-Le-with-mug_180x186A few weeks ago, I gave a keynote speech to a large group of youth involved in philanthropy, along with a few of their parents and mentors. My topic was “The Role of Equity in Philanthropy.” It was awesome that we had kids ages 8 to 24 engaged in grantmaking and other aspects of philanthropy. They were smart and hungry and full of hope and possibilities, bright minds not yet beaten down to a haggard shell haunted by endless grant rejections and complex community dynamics and the sudden dawning realization of the ephemerality of existence, cowering in the supply closet on a fold-out cot, cradling a stuffed unicorn while Green Day’s “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” plays softly from a phone.

(What, like your Friday nights are soooo much more exciting.)

“As budding philanthropists,” I said to the youth, “you have probably seen the illustration of the difference between Equality and Equity. You know, the drawing of those kids standing on those boxes looking over a fence at people playing baseball.”

As if on cue, two kids came up to the stage with a drawing they had done earlier of the iconic image on easel paper. I stuck it to the lectern. “Get used to this image,” I said, “Have it burned into your mind. Because you will not be able to avoid it. It will haunt your dreams.”

Equality and Equity are frequently brought up in our field, oftentimes with colorful metaphors like “Equality is making sure everyone gets a pair of shoes, but Equity is ensuring that everyone’s shoes actually fits them.” A female colleague of mine once said, “Think about bathrooms. Equality is about men and women both having bathrooms. But Equity is ensuring that…uh…there’s more toilet paper in the women’s bathroom, because we need it more…”

Whatever the metaphor, there seems to be this general belief that Equity is an advanced version of Equality, or that they both are great but in different ways. But in the past few years, I’ve seen more and more evidence that Equality actually prevents Equity from succeeding. Equality is a strong force, and we are drawn to its sexy and hypnotic, but ultimately destructive power. Here are a few areas, some discussed in previous posts, where Equality’s gravity pulls us into its deadly orbit:

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10 Things To Do When You’re Having a Bad Day

by Joan Garry

Joan GarryYesterday morning I received an email from a coaching client.

Subject line: Do You Have Time? Feelin’ Wobbly.

Now I receive hundreds of emails from nonprofit leaders with challenges. Sadly, too many of them are of the five-alarm blaze variety. Toxic board members, a nonprofit ED who had been working for months without pay – you get the idea.

But yesterday, this leader was just wobbly. And he’s not a wobbly type. This particular client is hard wired steady. Or presents that way in nearly every situation.

Yet, a week of changing the world had left him “shaken,” “off his game,” and questioning choices and decisions. Wobbly. Just having a bad day.

Been there?

Yup. Me too. The donor you didn’t treat quite right lays into you. You review the candidate pool for an open senior position and there’s no there there. A volunteer drops an important ball. Plenty of war stories to go around.

Each thing independently is a nuisance or a solid challenge and yet, the collection of them makes you feel like a boxer feeling for the ropes to try gain some balance.

Today, I offer you my 10 Step Program for Wobbly Nonprofit leaders – how to steady yourself and get back in the game.

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